Sculptural Baskets

Participants learn how to use metal mesh or chicken wire to construct a basic form such as a cylinder or sphere. Pliable branches or vines are then lashed to the framework to create a sculptural basket. In basketry, lashing is a technique used to hold things in place securely. In this case copper wire is used to lash natural materials in a spiralling motion around the metal framework. These baskets can be used as functional vessels and will add natural charm to a home or garden. Not strictly a basket or a sculpture this form breaks with convention and opens up new possibilities for making forms.

The Artist Tutor would like to acknowledge Sue Dilley for teaching this technique to her (who in turn learned it from Wona Bae). Wona Bae has creatively adapted the Japanese technique of tatami, which is more traditionally used to make mats and screens. Other contemporary florists are also adapting this technique to use in their work.

Basketry is one of the oldest crafts, traditional techniques have been handed down through the generations. This basket makes use of traditional techniques that have been used creatively by Wona Bae. She is a unique crafts person who blends Artistry and Floristry in her collaborative work with partner Charlie Lawler. Their work can be viewed at Loose Leaf: https://looseleafstore.com.au/

Sculptural Basketry Workshop held at the Creswick Neighbourhood Centre in June 2021
Sculptural Basketry Workshop held at the Creswick Neighbourhood Centre in June 2021
Sculptural Basketry Workshop held at the Creswick Neighbourhood Centre in June 2021
Sculptural Basketry Workshop held at the Creswick Neighbourhood Centre in June 2021
Sculptural Basketry Workshop held at the Creswick Neighbourhood Centre in June 2021
Sculptural Basketry Workshop held at the Creswick Neighbourhood Centre in June 2021
Jodie Goldring, Sculptural Basket 1, silver birch, recycled steel mesh & copper wire, 2020
Jodie Goldring, Sculptural Basket 2, muehlenbeckia, recycled chicken wire & copper wire, 2020